Shared Reading Lesson



Lesson Plan – Shared Reading
Name: Alana Gray        Cohort: F        Grade: 3         Day: 1    
Lesson Description
Book: “Jumanji” written by Chris Van Allsburg
Time Frame: 15 – 20 minutes/day for 5 days
Ontario Curriculum: Overall Expectations
Read and demonstrate an understanding of a variety of literary, graphic, and informational texts, using a range of strategies to construct meaning.
Ontario Curriculum: Specific Expectations
Identify a variety of reading comprehension strategies and use them appropriately before, during, and after reading to understand texts.
Make inferences about texts using stated and implied ideas from the text as evidence.
Learning Goals
By taking a picture walk as an introduction to a new text, students will make predictions and inferences about the subject of the text, and what the plot may entail.  This will help engage students with a text that is unfamiliar to them.  Students will learn the value of taking a picture walk in expanding their reading comprehension, because they will learn to read with meaning.
Success Criteria
Students will make reasonable predictions about what may occur in the text based on the illustrations.  Students will verbalize how a picture walk helped them to understand the text, after reading.
Materials
“Jumanji” written by Chris Van Allsburg
Chart paper
Marker
Lesson Format – Day 1
Motivational Hook/Engagement/Introduction 
Preview the book – show students the cover and read them the title.  Ask if any students have seen the movie Jumanji (the movie came out in 1995, I would expect that not many students are familiar with the story).  Ask students what do they notice about the cover?  The picture is in black and white.  What is featured on the cover?  What ideas does this give you about what the story may be about?  Tell students that as a class you are going to make predictions about the book.  Give students a moment to prepare an answer and ask them to think pair and share.  Record predictions on chart paper to refer back to later.  Tell students that you are going to take a picture walk (to ensure you are using the language – predict, picture walk).  Stop on every page and ask students what characters they see, and what is going on in each illustration.  Ask students to make predictions about the illustration on page 2 about where these children may be going and why.  On page 3, ask students what the children are doing, and by viewing the illustrations on page 4 and 5 ask how students think the lion came to be in the house.  Ask students to make a prediction, then think pair and share, and record predictions.  I would stop on each page and ask students what does it look like is happening in the text based on this illustration.  After previewing the entire book, ask students how the illustrations help them to make predictions, and how does it assist in their understanding.  Major predictions should be recorded on chart paper in order to confirm during the reading whether or not these predictions were accurate.
During
During reading, I would stop at the points where specific predictions were made and ask students if these predictions were correct.  At the point in the text when Peter suggests that he does not want to play the game anymore, I would stop and ask students to make a prediction about what the outcome will be if they stop playing the game (record answers).  When Judy takes a turn and the spot she lands on says “monkeys steal food, miss a turn”, I would ask students to make predictions about what they think will happen next.  I would stop at the point when Judy takes her last turn and lands on Jumanji and ask students to make a prediction about what will happen next.  On the last page, I would ask students what they think Danny and Walter had found, and what the result of this would be.  During reading, I would refer to the predictions listed on the chart paper that were made prior to reading for a visual aid students can refer to.
After: Consolidation
I would ask students why is it important to follow instructions, and what can happen when one does not follow instructions.  I would discuss with students reading strategies we implemented during the reading such as a picture walk, then I would ask how this might help them to understand the text.  I would ask students what information could be gained from viewing the illustrations.  I would ask students to make a judgment about the text – did they like it?  Why or why not?
Extension Activities
Use “Jumanji” as a springboard for a drama activity.  I would have students in groups of 4 select  a portion or page out of the text in order to create a tableau.  Students can be assessed using the curriculum for drama.
Assessment
This activity constitutes an assessment for learning, during which the teacher will make observations.  Assess whether the students use appropriate strategies to decode unfamiliar words.  Is the student then able to transfer that knowledge to a new situation, where they are using the newly learned words in their own sentences?  The teacher may keep mental notes or jot notes during this activity to keep track of student comprehension and progress.
Special Education Notes:
If possible and if necessary, provide students with their own copy of the text so they can follow along more closely.  Write questions on the chart paper for students to see.  Do actions when defining words from the text.  Allow some students to draw pictures depicting the vocabulary words rather than writing sentences.  Allow some students to use the computer to type sentences.  Have students state their sentences to the teacher orally rather than writing them.

Lesson Plan – Shared Reading
Name: Alana Gray        Cohort: F        Grade: 3         Day: 2    
Lesson Description
Book: “Jumanji” written by Chris Van Allsburg
Time Frame: 15 – 20 minutes/day for 5 days
Ontario Curriculum: Overall Expectations
Use knowledge of words and cueing systems to read fluently.
Ontario Curriculum: Specific Expectations
Predict the meaning of and rapidly solve unfamiliar words using different types of cues.
Learning Goals
Students will actively participate in defining unfamiliar words found within the text.  Students will learn about word decoding strategies.  This activity will help students to read with fluency.
Success Criteria
Students will demonstrate their understanding of the new words they learned from the text by using them correctly in sentences.
Materials
“Jumanji” written by Chris Van Allsburg
Chart paper
Marker
Lesson Format – Day 2
Motivational Hook/Engagement/Introduction 
I would discuss with students the importance of decoding unfamiliar words during reading, and how this helps them to understand the text overall.  If students do not understand a given word within a text, they may misinterpret meaning and therefore it is important to be aware of different strategies in order to read fluently, and to read with meaning.  Inform students that the purpose of today’s reading is as a class, we will decode words we were unfamiliar with.  I will model this strategy for them using the first word, and students will join in, in order to decode the subsequent words.
During
During the second reading of “Jumanji”, I would highlight words and expressions that students may not understand in order to expand their vocabulary and comprehension.  I would ask students what it means to slouch, and to show me using their bodies what slouching looks like (I would participate as well, demonstrating a slouch).  I would ask students what the expression might mean, “fun for some but not for all” and brainstorm ideas about what this may indicate.  I would also ask, what does it mean when another person is at your heels?  I would use a cloze sentence structure for the following sentence: “Judy tried to ______ some leaves down Peter’s sweater.”  The purpose for this cloze sentence is the omitted word is stuff, and children may only understand stuff meaning things, rather than to stuff something.  Although the word stuff would already be in students’ vocabulary, they may not know the alternative meaning of the word.  The last sentence on page 3 is capitalized, I would ask students why this might be (to stress importance).  One of the characters says “Gosh, how exciting” in a very unexcited tone.  I would ask students in unison to say gosh how exciting in what they believe to be an unexciting tone.  I would also ask students to show me what a look of horror may look like.  During the story, a monsoon begins.  I would ask students what they think a monsoon is, and I would instruct them to use the illustration as a hint.  I would ask students to show me with their bodies what hunched means.  I would ask students about synonyms for perhaps are.  I would ask students what a faint buzzing sounds like as opposed to a loud buzzing.  I would use a cloze paragraph for the following: “Together they listened to a _____ [rumble] in the hallway.  It grew louder and louder.  Suddenly a herd of rhinos _____ [charge] through the living room and into the dining room.”  I would discuss with students possible words that would make sense within this context in order to expand their vocabulary.  Cloze paragraphs provide a teaching opportunity for students to learn about synonyms.  Describe to students that a synonym is two words with the same meaning.  Provide an example of a synonym, and have students provide examples of words they learned from the text that could be replaced with a synonym.
After: Consolidation
On chart paper, I would make a list with students of new words we learned from “Jumanji.”  These words include slouch, stuff (as in to fill), monsoon, hunch, rumble, and charge.  I would review the meaning of these words with students and based on their understanding, have them write sentences using each of the new words they learned.
Extension Activities
I would ask students to brainstorm and verbally share sentences using any of words we learned during the reading.  In pairs, students could use a dictionary to define each word.  We could also discuss synonyms and come up with a list of synonyms for each new word we learned.
Assessment
During reading while asking students to demonstrate with their bodies the meaning of a word, it should become apparent to the teacher which students grasp the concept, and which are struggling.  When students offer examples of how the words can be used in new sentences, this indicates student understanding and provides an opportunity for assessment.  The teacher may make a mental or jot note during this activity to keep track of student comprehension and progress.  This activity constitutes an assessment for learning.
Special Education Notes:
For any students with difficulties, they could use the computer or white board to write their sentences.  Students may also share their sentences orally with the teacher.  The teacher may also pair up the weaker students with the stronger ones in order to help the weaker student.

Lesson Plan – Shared Reading
Name: Alana Gray        Cohort: F        Grade: 3         Day: 3    
Lesson Description
Book: “Jumanji” written by Chris Van Allsburg
Time Frame: 15 – 20 minutes/day for 5 days
Ontario Curriculum: Overall Expectations
Read and demonstrate an understanding of a variety of literary, graphic, and informational texts, using a range of strategies to construct meaning.
Ontario Curriculum: Specific Expectations
Identify a variety of reading comprehension strategies and use them appropriately before, during, and after reading to understand texts.
Demonstrate understanding of a variety of texts by identifying important ideas and some supporting details.
Learning Goals
Students will learn about the difference between a retelling and summary of a story.  Students will perform a retelling and a summary of “Jumanji.” 
Success Criteria
Students will provide a retelling of “Jumanji”, as well as a summary.   Students will select the most important points of the text in order to develop a summary.
Materials
“Jumanji” written by Chris Van Allsburg
CD version of “Jumanji” reading by Robin Williams
Chart paper
Marker
Lesson Format – Day 3
Motivational Hook/Engagement/Introduction 
Day 3 I will focus on comprehension strategies, having the students create meaning from the text.  I would begin by asking students who remembers details about “Jumanji”, the text we read together the day prior.  I would ask students to tell me one event that occurred in the beginning of the text, one event that occurred in the middle, and one event that occurred at the end.  I would record student’s answers on chart paper.  This activity will have students recall details from the text from the previous day.
During
I would play the reading of “Jumanji” by Robin Williams without stopping so that students can hear the text uninterrupted, for deeper engagement.
After: Consolidation
After listening, I would inform students that we are going to discuss a retelling of the story, as well as a summary.  I would explain that in a retelling, I want to hear as many details as possible.  On chart paper, I would write the headings: “Characters”, “Setting”, “Problem/Plot”, and “Other.”  I would explain that these are features that can be found in fiction texts, such as “Jumanji.”  I would ask students about the difference between fiction and non-fiction.  Back to the chart, I would ask students to give me as many details as possible about the story, and to tell me under which heading they belong.  I would have students popcorn answers, and any details that did not fit in one of the first three headings, I would include in “Other” (or if they are about a common topic, find an appropriate heading).  I would ask students what the main problem was, and how it was resolved and discuss how this element is a part of the plot.  In a different colored marker, I would then add to the chart we made prior to reading the book where we discussed events that occurred in the beginning, the middle, and the end.  I would ask students if we need to revise or add to these answers, as they may have remembered details after reading the text a third time that they may have forgotten prior to rereading.  The reason I would use a different colored marker would be because it will provide a visual cue to students that emphasizes the way a rereading can change students understanding.  When the retelling is complete, I would inform students that we are going to now do a summary.  I would explain to them that in a summary, we only discuss the most important parts of features of a text.  I would ask students to turn to an elbow partner, and discuss with their partner the things/events that were the most important parts in “Jumanji.”  These things/events will sum up the entire story.  I would then give all students an opportunity to share their answers, and record these answers on chart paper.  As a class, we would put these things/events in chronological order, and going over every answer, I would ask students to show me thumbs up or thumbs down as to whether they agree that the answers posted were in fact the most important parts of the book.  If any students disagree, we would have an open discussion about why they disagree and students would have to think their answers through in order to defend them.  After completing this activity, I would ask students to remind me of what the difference is between a retelling and a summary.
Extension Activities
While the answers are posted on chart paper for the class to see, have students write 5-7 sentences independently in which they will share what they believe were the most important parts of the book.  I would have them label this page “Summary of Jumanji” to familiarize them with the term.  Students could also draw a picture to go with their sentences depicting a scene from “Jumanji.”
Assessment
The written piece produced during the extension is a great opportunity for assessment to determine whether the students understand what a summary is, and what information should be included in a summary.  The teacher may choose to use a checkbric during this activity to keep track of student comprehension and progress.  I would not assign a grade, rather I would use this written piece as an assessment for learning.
Special Education Notes:
If possible, provide students with their own copy of the text so they can follow along more closely.  Write questions on the chart paper for students to see.  Allow some students to use the computer to type sentences.  Allow some students to tell the teacher orally about their summary of “Jumanji.”

Lesson Plan – Shared Reading
Name: Alana Gray        Cohort: F        Grade: 3         Day: 4   
Lesson Description
Book: “Jumanji” written by Chris Van Allsburg
Time Frame: 15 – 20 minutes/day for 5 days
Ontario Curriculum: Overall Expectations
Recognize a variety of text forms, text features, and stylistic elements and demonstrate understanding of how they help communicate meaning.
Ontario Curriculum: Specific Expectations
Identify some elements of style, including voice, word choice, and different types of sentences, and explain how they help readers understand texts.
Learning Goals
In this lesson, students will be analyzing the text.  Students will learn to identify verbs within “Jumanji”, and identify the difference between an expressive and detailed verb as opposed to a generic verb.  Analyzing the text will help students to understand the writer’s form and style; it will also help students to read with fluency.  This lesson will help students to build on their vocabulary.
Success Criteria
Students will identify verbs from the story “Jumanji” and demonstrate their understanding by drawing comparisons between the verbs found in the text and generic verbs.
Materials
“Jumanji” written by Chris Van Allsburg
White boards
Dry erase markers
Chart paper
Marker
Lesson Format – Day 4
Motivational Hook/Engagement/Introduction 
Recap with students what a verb is (I would not do this lesson as an introduction to verbs, rather as a reinforcement of the concept).  Have students brainstorm verbs and popcorn their answers.  Inform students that you are going to reread “Jumanji” and focus on the way in which the author uses verbs within the text, and after reading, as a class you will discuss the effect it has on readers.
During
Provide students with white boards and markers (students enjoy writing on these) and ask them to jot down any verbs they hear you say during reading.  When it comes to a section that is packed with expressive verbs, read slowly to ensure students hear you say the words.  If need be, repeat a given passage.
After: Consolidation
After reading, with the class create a t-chart of expressive verbs and simple verbs.  As a class, come up with examples not from the text but based on their own knowledge.  For example, include the verb walk under the heading simple, and use parade or trek under the expressive heading.  Ask students to provide you with examples of verbs they heard from the text, which they will have written down on their white boards (for example – slam, charge, squeeze, scramble).  As a class, decide which heading these verbs belong under, and come up with a verb that has the same meaning but the opposite effect.  Explain to students that these are synonyms, and that you discussed synonyms in a prior lesson about “Jumanji.” This will act as reinforcement to the prior lesson, but with a focus on a different part of language – verbs.  After this activity is complete, ask students what affect it had on them as readers when the author used expressive verbs as opposed to simple and generic verbs.  Discuss with students that the use of descriptive verbs can help the reader to develop a clear and vivid picture in their minds of what is occurring in the text, and that it helps the reader to read with expression.
Extension Activities
“Jumanji” can be used to implement a math lesson.  Provide students with the game board (see attached).  Explain to students that there are 48 squares in total, and that they know from the text that Peter and Judy had 6 turns each.  They know from the text what both Judy and Peter rolled for 3 of those 6 turns, and they need to decide what other potential numbers they could have rolled.  Explain that there can be several combinations, and they should come up with a list of these combinations.  This can be done individually, or in partners, and should be phrased as a problem-solving question.  The teacher could have students write or orally develop sentences using the verbs found throughout the text.
Assessment
The teacher has an opportunity to assess during the consolidation period.  Based on student responses, the teacher can gage which students understand what a verb is.  The teacher may choose to make jot notes, or simply take a mental during this activity to keep track of student comprehension and progress.  This activity constitutes an assessment for learning.
Special Education Notes:
During the reading while students are recording verbs they hear, a student who may have difficulty could be paired up with a stronger student so that they can work together to create a list of verbs they hear during reading.  Provide students with a thesaurus if necessary.  For the extension activity, the teacher may choose to work one on one with a student, or a group of students, who need the extra assistance.  The teacher may also choose to put students into groups depending on strengths and weaknesses.  

Lesson Plan – Shared Reading
Name: Alana Gray        Cohort: F        Grade: 3         Day: 5
Lesson Description
Book: “Jumanji” written by Chris Van Allsburg
Ontario Curriculum: Overall Expectations
Generate, gather, and organize ideas and information and write for an intended purpose and audience.
Ontario Curriculum: Specific Expectations
Identify the topic, purpose, audience, and form for writing.
Generate ideas about a potential topic, using a variety of strategies and resources.
Learning Goals
In this lesson, students will make connections between the book and movie version of “Jumanji”, students will critique both the book and the movie, and they will make an evaluation of “Jumanji.”  Students will view a scene from the movie version of “Jumanji”, and make comparisons between the movie version and the text, forcing them to use critical thinking skills.
Success Criteria
Students will develop a written piece in which they compare and contrast a scene from the movie with the book version of “Jumanji”, and they will discuss the version they prefer and provide support for their decision.
Materials
“Jumanji” written by Chris Van Allsburg
Movie version of “Jumanji”
Paper
Pencil
Lesson Format – Day 5
Motivational Hook/Engagement/Introduction 
I would review with students the reading strategies we employed over the last 4 days during our reading of “Jumanji.”  We would go over what we learned during each lesson, so these ideas are fresh in the minds of students.  I would ask them why the activities we are important, and how it changed their understanding of the text.  I would select a 5-10 minute scene from the movie that is depicted in the book.  I would opt not to show the entire movie, as this may be too much for grade 3 students and they will lose focus of the task.  As a class, we would discuss the differences between the book and movie version of “Jumanji.”  I would ask students if the movie portrayal was as they pictured it would be during readings.  I would have students brainstorm as a class the differences and similarities they saw between the book and the movie when it comes to the setting, the characters, and the event(s).  I would ask students how they felt viewing the movie, and how did their understanding of “Jumanji” change when they were able to visualize the text.  This would be a good warm up to get students thinking about their writing task.  I would instruct students that they will be writing a short paragraph (4-7 sentences) about which version they prefer and they will provide reasons why they liked one version over the other. 
During
This writing activity is based on an evaluation of the story of “Jumanji”, and a critique of both the book and the movie version.  Students will demonstrate critical thinking skills in order to produce an opinion, and a written piece.  During the writing phase, I would circulate the room and assist any students having difficulties.
After: Consolidation
I would ask the class in a show of hands who liked the movie better, and who liked the book.  I would ask students to volunteer to share their responses with the class.  Preferably I would like it if all students could share their responses, however if there was not enough time to do so, I would select students who chose the book and other students who chose the movie as their preference so that reasoning is provided for both versions.
Extension Activities
With this activity, the teacher could select one scene from the movie and compare it to the book, or show the entire movie.  The teacher could also run a writer’s workshop where students peer edit each other’s work.  As a class, students could create a t chart in which they compare the book to the movie.
Assessment
I would evaluate the written piece produced by students using a rubric.  I would clearly explain to students the expectations of their writing, what type of information they should include, and ensure they understand the task prior to writing.  This assignment would constitute an assessment of learning.
Special Education Notes:
Some students may be provided a computer in order to complete their writing task.  Students who do not perform well at paper and pencil tasks may also share their response verbally with the teacher.





Focus
Content
Style
Conventions
Level 4
Writing contains a clear focus with an opinion.  Clear supporting details are present.
There are many strong developed points in support of writer’s opinion.
Writer’s feelings are clear.  Word choice is appropriate.  Sentences vary in length and structure.
All sentences are complete.  There are few or no errors in grammar, spelling, and punctuation. 
Level 3
Writing contains a clear focus with an opinion.  Supporting details are limited.
There are some points in support of writer’s opinion.
Writer’s feelings are somewhat clear.  Word choice contains some appropriate language.  Sentences show some variety in length and structure.
Most sentences are complete.  There are few errors in grammar, spelling, and punctuation.
Level 2
Writing states an opinion, but offers supporting details which are not developed or are unclear.
Few details with limited development to support writer’s opinion
Writer’s feelings are not clearly expressed to the audience.  Limited variety of sentence structure and word choices.
Many sentences are incomplete.  There are many errors in spelling, punctuation, and grammar which makes the writing difficult to read.
Level 1
The opinion and supporting details are unclear.
There are no details or points to support writer’s opinion.
Writer’s feelings are unknown.  Most sentences are short and choppy.  Word choice is limited.
Most sentences are incomplete.  Many errors in grammar, spelling, and punctuating making the writing difficult to understand.











“Jumanji”, written by Chris Van Allsburg provides many rich teaching opportunities for young students.  I chose to implement this text in a grade 3 class, as opposed to grade 1 or 2, because the language of the book is somewhat sophisticated.  The text provides many opportunities to discuss with students language, punctuation, parts of speech, and grammar.  There are many teaching points to be drawn from “Jumanji” that helps students to develop their vocabulary.  I also selected this text because there is a DVD version students could view as well as an audio reading by Robin Williams.  This text is very imaginative and I believe the subject would engage students and capture their interest.  This text lends itself to cross-curricular connections from Language, Drama, and Mathematics.  “Jumanji” is a beloved tale spanning several generations, and although it is an older text, I believe it is still valuable for current students.  While in a standard Language Arts lesson plan, I may include several specific curriculum expectations, because this is a 5 day shared reading lesson I chose only 1 to 2 specific expectations for each day as not to lose focus.  During my final lesson, students would produce a written piece as a culminating task, which I would use to evaluate student’s knowledge.

Works Cited

Van Allsburg, Chris. “Jumanji.” Houghton Mifflin Harcourt: New York, 2011.

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